What is an F1 Goldendoodle?

What is an F1 Goldendoodle?

F1 Goldendoodle dog wearing start-shaped sunglasses

“What is an F1 Goldendoodle?” I vividly remember trying to get my head around all the lingo associated with Goldendoodles before Chloe, our now 6-year-old Goldendoodle, joined our pack. (By the way, she is an F1B Goldendoodle.)

F1 Goldendoodle. F1B Goldendoodle. What was the difference? You may be wondering the same thing.

So today I’m spilling the tea on what I’ve researched and learned about the F1 Goldendoodle. (I’m lucky to have two F1 Goldendoodles in our extended family pack!) I hope it helps you as you’re doing your homework on what makes Goldendoodles such great dogs and whether they are the best choice for your family.

BTW…you may be wondering who the hands (and paws) are behind this article and website. Chloe is a ball-loving, red Goldendoodle, my sidekick, and my inspiration. She shares happiness with everyone she meets. I’m a Goldendoodle mom, award-winning blogger, and dog-trepreneur (start-up business owner and consultant focused on the dog industry). You could also say that I am half Doodle crazy and half Doodle research hound. 😉

First, let’s define the meaning of F1 Goldendoodle:

An F1 Goldendoodle is a cross between a purebred Golden Retriever and a purebred Poodle.

In other words, the F1 Goldendoodle is half Golden Retriever and half Poodle. This is also called a “first cross.”

A picture is worth a thousand words, so here is a graphic I created to explain the term F1 Goldendoodle…

Diagram depicting the F1 Goldendoodle as a result of crossing a Golden Retriever and a Poodle

Why do people use the term F1 to describe a Goldendoodle?

While “F1” and “first cross” are used interchangeably in talking Goldendoodles, let’s bring out the science books and get into the nitty-gritty. Interestingly, the term “F1” is not specific to Goldendoodles or even dogs. From a broader perspective, F1 stands for “filial 1 hybrid” or “first filial generation.” The definition of F1 hybrid is:

The first filial generation of offspring of distinctly different parental types.

The most common example of a filial 1 hybrid is the mule. Mules are F1 hybrids between a horse and a donkey.

Now that you have a definition of the term F1 Goldendoodle, you may be wondering about specific characteristics such as shedding, coat types, and coat colors. More importantly, you may be wondering why Goldendoodles are known for making such great family dogs.

Does an F1 Goldendoodle shed?

Let’s “shed” some light on this question! You may have heard the sweeping statement that Goldendoodles don’t shed. Is this true?

First of all, every dog does shed to some degree. Second, because there is so much variation in an essentially mixed or crossbreed dog, there is no hard and fast rule about the amount a Goldendoodle sheds. It will depend on whether the Goldendoodle “leans” more to the Poodle (low shedding) side of the family or the Golden Retriever (high shedding) side of the family. (For more facts about Goldendoodles and shedding, check out my article, Do Goldendoodles Shed?)

What does an F1 Goldendoodle’s coat look like?

F1 Goldendoodle puppy walking on sidewalk
Meet sweet, smart Ruby. She’s an F1 Goldendoodle.

Since there is so much variation between the Golden Retriever coat and the Poodle coat, the F1 Goldendoodle can have a wide variation in coat type. Some Doods will have a straight coat, some will have a wavy coat, and some a curly coat. I believe that’s part of the fun of “Goldendoodlehood.” I’m the aunt of two F1 Goldendoodles. As you can see in the photos below, their coats are very different.

F1 Goldendoodle dog wearing red bandana and sunglasses
This comical F1 Goldendoodle is named Star. She’s part of our extended family pack.
Red F1 Goldendoodle as a puppy with a darker red coat and as an adult with a lighter red coat
Happy, easy-going Ruby’s puppy and adult pics give you a glimpse of her sweet disposition. You could describe her coat as loose wavy.

What’s the difference between an F1 Goldendoodle and an F1B Goldendoodle?

Now that I’ve spilled the tea on the F1 Goldendoodle, you may be wondering why some Goldendoodles are described as “F1B.”

The F1B is a cross between a Poodle and an F1 Goldendoodle. In this case, the “B” stands for “backcross.” (For more details, please read my article on the F1B Goldendoodle.) If shedding is a concern to you, then the F1B Goldendoodle may be a better option.

F1B Goldendoodle wearing medallion award
Chloe is an F1B Goldendoodle, my sidekick, and the inspiration behind our award-winning blog.

What color is an F1 Goldendoodle?

F1 Goldendoodle puppy face
Star’s puppy picture shows her cream-colored puppy coat.

Whether F1, F1B or other combinations, the adorable Goldendoodle can be seen sporting coats of many different colors. Goldendoodles get their wide variety of coat colors from the parent breeds. The Poodle breed sports black, red, cream, and ivory coat colors. The Golden Retriever breed is red or light golden in color.

F1 Goldendoodle puppy with wavy coat
Ruby’s puppy picture shows her firecracker red coat.

Common colors for F1 Goldendoodles include ivory, cream, red, apricot, chocolate (brown), black, and parti or multi-colored.

Doodles are “Golden”

So those are the basic physical characteristics of the F1 Goldendoodle. Now, what about the goodness inside that cute package? While I can’t tell you about every Goldendoodle, I can tell you that the Goldendoodles in our family (Chloe, Star, and Ruby) have been priceless members of our family pack. They’ve brought countless smiles through their comical personalities, an infinite number of snuggles, and endless amounts of love. They truly are “Golden.”

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Note: I am not a breeder, veterinarian, or trainer. I AM a Doodle Mom who loves spreading Goldendoodle happiness and I am committed to researching and sharing all things Doodle so that others can enjoy these remarkable dogs and live the Goldendoodle lifestyle.

What questions do you have about the F1 Goldendoodle?

Please comment below.

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